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White-glove sale for Strauss & Co’s opening auction of 2020!

Monarch Hotel Strauss Auction JoziStyle Edward Chamberlain-Bell

Strauss & Co achieved a prestigious white-glove sale when every one of the 164 lots at last night’s Monarch Hotel auction found a buyer.
This accomplishment – in a highly challenging economy – was driven by Strauss & Co’s reputation for bringing to market top quality collections that are backed by the unrivalled expertise of its art specialists. The Monarch Hotel’s impressive art collection, accumulated over a number of years and displayed in the hotel’s public areas and luxurious private bedroom suites, was up for sale as part of the liquidation of this prestigious Johannesburg boutique hotel.

White-glove sale for Strauss & Co’s opening auction of 2020

Johannesburg, 6 February: Strauss & Co achieved a prestigious white-glove sale when every one of the 164 lots at last night’s Monarch Hotel auction found a buyer.
This accomplishment – in a highly challenging economy – was driven by Strauss & Co’s reputation for bringing to market top quality collections that are backed by the unrivalled expertise of its art specialists. The Monarch Hotel’s impressive art collection, accumulated over a number of years and displayed in the hotel’s public areas and luxurious private bedroom suites, was up for sale as part of the liquidation of this prestigious Johannesburg boutique hotel.

With the event being live streamed, bidding was fierce from the start, especially on the 60 quirky, witty and provocative ‘biographical’ ceramic plates by artist Ruan Hoffmann that had been mass displayed in the Monarch Hotel’s dining and conference rooms. In a remarkable confirmation of Hoffmann’s standing as one of South Africa’s most high-profile and internationally collectable ceramic artists, all the plates far outstripped their pre-sale estimates of R1 000 – 2 000 per plate, pursued by collectors in the USA, the UK and Australia as well as the huge crowd in the room. Among the highlights were “I Won’t Listen” (R21 105), “Well … F*** Me” (R12 898), “I Had Enough” (R 12 898) and “Baby Let it Go” (R12 311).

The top lot on the night was the Walter Battiss tapestry It’s Fly Day in the hotel’s reception area. Woven by the Marguerite Stephens Tapestry Studio, the Battiss sold for R 211 050, far outstripping its pre-sale estimate of R 80 000 – 120 000. Also attracting strong bidding were a large-scale David Koloane abstract painting, Abstract Cityscape, which sold for R 146 563, more than double its pre-sale low estimate of R 70 000, and Abstract Nude, a rare oil painting by Belgian-South African artist Herman van Nazareth, that sold for R 87 938, significantly more than its pre-sale estimate of R 30 000 – 50 000.
In a sale totalling R 2,180 million, the Top 10 lots included Deborah Bell’s Equinox (R 87 938), Andrew Verster’s Untitled (Fragile Paradise) (R 82 075), Brett Murray’s Nagapie in the Headlights (R 52 763), Corné Joubert’s Veiled Bride (R 46 900), Robert Slingsby’s Fountain Sculpture (R 46 900), Dumile Feni’s Resurrection from the Holy Book (R 44 555) and Breyten Breytenbach’s
Gorée la Nuit (Gorée at Night) (R 41 038).

As well as being the company’s first white-glove sale, last night’s event marked another milestone in Strauss & Co’s constant efforts to make art buying increasingly accessible. The live streaming, with live bidding, allowed collectors to bid online from anywhere in the world while watching the auction unfold.

The next Strauss & Co sale is the much-anticipated Contemporary Art auction in Cape Town on 15 February. Now in its third year, this benchmark annual sale coincides with the Investec Cape Town Art Fair and will feature 102 carefully vetted lots, among them a consignment of pan-African works from a major South African collector.

With the event being live-streamed, bidding was fierce from the start, especially on the 60 quirky, witty and provocative ‘biographical’ ceramic plates by artist Ruan Hoffmann that had been mass displayed in the Monarch Hotel’s dining and conference rooms. In a remarkable confirmation of Hoffmann’s standing as one of South Africa’s most high-profile and internationally collectable ceramic artists, all the plates far outstripped their pre-sale estimates of R1 000 – 2 000 per plate, pursued by collectors in the USA, the UK and Australia as well as the huge crowd in the room. Among the highlights were “I Won’t Listen” (R21 105), “Well … F*** Me” (R12 898), “I Had Enough” (R 12 898) and “Baby Let it Go” (R12 311).

The top lot on the night was the Walter Battiss tapestry It’s Fly Day in the hotel’s reception area. Woven by the Marguerite Stephens Tapestry Studio, the Battiss sold for R 211 050, far outstripping its pre-sale estimate of R 80 000 – 120 000. Also attracting strong bidding were a large-scale David Koloane abstract painting, Abstract Cityscape, which sold for R 146 563, more than double its pre-sale low estimate of R 70 000, and Abstract Nude, a rare oil painting by Belgian-South African artist Herman van Nazareth, that sold for R 87 938, significantly more than its pre-sale estimate of R 30 000 – 50 000.
In a sale totalling R 2,180 million, the Top 10 lots included Deborah Bell’s Equinox (R 87 938), Andrew Verster’s Untitled (Fragile Paradise) (R 82 075), Brett Murray’s Nagapie in the Headlights (R 52 763), Corné Joubert’s Veiled Bride (R 46 900), Robert Slingsby’s Fountain Sculpture (R 46 900), Dumile Feni’s Resurrection from the Holy Book (R 44 555) and Breyten Breytenbach’s
Gorée la Nuit (Gorée at Night) (R 41 038).

As well as being the company’s first white-glove sale, last night’s event marked another milestone in Strauss & Co’s constant efforts to make art buying increasingly accessible. The live streaming, with live bidding, allowed collectors to bid online from anywhere in the world while watching the auction unfold.

The next Strauss & Co sale is the much-anticipated Contemporary Art auction in Cape Town on 15 February. Now in its third year, this benchmark annual sale coincides with the Investec Cape Town Art Fair and will feature 102 carefully vetted lots, among them a consignment of pan-African works from a major South African collector.

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